Uncategorized

How Does the ADA Affect My Social Security Disability Claim in Rogers, AR?

Missouri residents with disabilities face many challenges, including receiving appropriate benefits and accommodations at work. It is common for people who qualify for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits to also be entitled to accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Let our Joplin, MO Social Security Disability attorneys explain the interplay between these two types of benefits available to individuals with disabilities. What is Social Security Disability? Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) is a benefits programs designed for the disabled and managed by the Social Security Administration. SSDI is only available to workers who have earned enough “work credits” with Social Security in order to be entitled to benefits. If you qualify and you are unemployed because of a physical or mental disability, then you may be entitled to certain benefits. When your disability application is submitted, your file is turned over to a designated state office that actually reviews your medical records and any other documentation you submit along with it. In Missouri, it is known as Missouri Disability Determination Services. These state agencies determine medical eligibility for Social Security disability for their residents. However, the process has been standardized throughout the country. Accommodations for Individuals Covered by the ADA The ADA refers to the Americans with Disabilities Act, which protects individuals with certain disabilities from being discriminated against in the workplace. The ADA also requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities in order for them to perform their job duties. However, if a requested accommodation would create an undue hardship on the employer, then the employer may not be required to provide that accommodation. Differences in SSD and the ADA One of the most basic differences between the ADA and SSD is that they have very different eligibility requirements. In particular, for an individual to receive SSD benefits, they must not be able to work. On the other hand, ADA protections are available for those who can still perform their essential job duties but may need a reasonable accommodation to do so. For that reason, individuals who qualify for SSD benefits typically do not qualify for ADA accommodations. This does not mean that you cannot make claims under both. If you have further questions about the differences, speak with one of our Joplin disability attorneys. How the Social Security Administration Considers ADA Accommodations When the Social Security Administration considers your disability claim, they will look at whether you have been able to perform your job duties. In doing so, they will consider any accommodations you may have received from your employer in order to perform your job in the past. In many cases, the Social Security Administration uses a vocational expert to assess whether an individual is capable of performing certain jobs. The required job duties are determined by the Dictionary of Occupational Titles published by the US Department of Labor. This dictionary provides a list of job titles and descriptions for all jobs for the entire country. Then the expert will determine the ability to perform those duties in light of their physical or mental limitations. Some Attorneys Recommend that you Stop Working When Applying for SSD Benefits Like collecting unemployment benefits, it is better to stop working, since you are claiming your disability prevents you from working.  If you don’t quit your job entirely, you should at least cut your hours substantially, in order to not jeopardize your eligibility for disability benefits. Social Security actually determines the amount of work you can do, while still being eligible for benefits.  This is known as the SGA (Substantial Gainful Activity). If you earn more than the Substantial Gainful Activity limit, your claim will likely be denied. Contact an Experienced Social Security Disability Attorney If you have further questions, discuss your situation with our Joplin disability attorneys. If you have questions regarding disability determinations, workplace accommodations, or any other Social Security disability matters in Arkansas or Missouri, please contact the Cottrell Law Office for a free consultation. You can contact us either online or by calling us toll-free at (800) 364-8305.

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Car Accidents

Should I Bring my Car Accident Case in Small Claims Court?

The majority of car accident lawsuits are filed in a district or circuit court in the state where the accident happened. However, which court is able to hear your case depends, in part, on the amount of your damages you are claiming to have suffered in your lawsuit. Most clients have heard of small claims court, but that is not where car accident cases are normally filed. When it is time to file your lawsuit, let a Rogers car accident attorney help you determine the proper venue. What Types of Cases can be Filed in Small Claims Court in Arkansas? In Rogers, it is the district court that has the jurisdiction to preside over a civil personal injury claim, but only if the damages being claimed is more than $5,000. Civil cases claiming damages less than that amount must be filed in with the Small Claims Division.  Small Claims matters usually involve personal property and contract claims. Car Accident Cases are Typically not Filed in Small Claims Court Only very minor car accident cases are filed in small claims court. In other words, the physical injuries and property damage being claimed as a result of the car accident must be very minor, totaling no more than $5,000. The majority of the time, a car accident case that is brought in small claims court only involves damage to the vehicle. What is Required to Prove a Car Accident Claim? Regardless of whether you bring your car accident claim in small claims court, there are certain facts that must be proven before you will be entitled to damages. It is necessary to prove that the other driver operated his or her vehicle negligently and that negligence caused your property damage and injuries. Cases where it can be shown that the other driver was violating the law when the accident occurred, then negligence can be simpler to prove. In some cases, violating a law related specifically to operating a vehicle can result in presumed liability. Be Sure to Submit Estimates to Prove Your Property Damage In order to recover for the damages your car sustained in the accident, you must prove the amount of those damages – that is the amount it will take to repair your car. It is best to provide the court with several estimates. A Rogers car accident attorney will likely recommend obtaining at least three. If you have already had your car repaired, then you can provide a copy of your canceled check or a receipt for the payments made to the repair shop, along with the three estimates. There are other elements of proof that can be submitted, so discuss your particular case with a Rogers car accident attorney to be sure you don’t miss anything. Even in Small Claims Court, You Need Witnesses A common misconception is that a small claims court case is not handled the same as any other civil case. Particularly, many people believe they do not have to present witnesses.  That is not always a safe assumption. Even though there is no jury in small claims court, the judge would still prefer to hear testimony from individuals who have personal knowledge regarding the car accident. As in any other case, the right witness can either make or break your case. It is important to remember, though, that your witnesses should be impartial, as opposed to friends or relatives unless they were in the car with you at the time of the accident and have relevant information.  Just like in other cases, if a witness will not agree to appear in court voluntarily to give testimony, a subpoena can be requested and issued by the court to compel the witness to testify, if necessary. Can I Submit an Accident Report From the Police in Small Claims Court? If liability is not obvious in your car accident case, then it is a good idea to get a copy of the police report. An accident report is admissible in small claims court because courts take the position that the officer called to the scene to investigate the circumstances is not only neutral but also in a better position to determine what actually happened. However, remember that the statements in the police report may not necessarily support your case. So, be sure to review it before you submit it to the court. If there are statements in the report that are not favorable to your case, then you can at least be prepared to defend against it. Usually, an eyewitness statement can be used to refute a statement made by the police officer in the accident report, as he or she was not an eyewitness. Contact a Skilled Missouri and Arkansas Auto Accident Lawyer If you have questions regarding car accidents or any other personal injury concerns in Arkansas or Missouri, please contact the Cottrell Law Office for a consultation, either online or by calling us at (800) 364-8305.

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Personal Injury

What Does Joint and Several Liability Mean to Joplin Personal Injury Attorneys?

In the area of personal injury, the term “joint and several liability” refers to the responsibility under the law that each person has when more than one person is involved in causing the same injury. The term actually refers to two separate forms of liability – joint liability and several liability. Here is what Joplin personal injury attorneys know when it comes to this type of case. Defining these two forms of liability Joint liability means that every person who is responsible for the injury is responsible for the full cost of the injury, regardless of the fact that more than one person is involved. On the other hand, several liability means that every person responsible for the injury is only responsible for the portion of the injury he or she actually caused. Joplin personal injury attorneys understand how these two types of liability work. How does joint and several liability work? What joint and several liability actually means is that each person at-fault is responsible for the full cost of damages for the injury.  However, if they pay the full cost, they can recover the amount they overpaid from the other at-fault parties involved. So, if it is difficult or impossible to determine the portion of fault to assign to each person, then you can recover from one or the other. Later, they can sort out amongst themselves whether one of them owes the other for “overpaying” his portion of the damages. That type of transaction is known as contribution. Regardless, the injured party can receive no more than 100 percent of what is owed. In some cases, a court will actually determine the specific amount each party is responsible for paying. The purpose of joint and several liability As Joplin personal injury attorneys recognize, the main purpose of joint and several liability is that, by requiring everyone who is responsible for the injury of another, that person is more likely to receive full compensation. This is true regardless of whether the at-fault parties are not equally responsible for the injury. For example, if at-fault party A is 90 percent at fault, but both at-fault parties are required to pay 100 percent, then the injured party is more likely to be compensated even if party A has no money. How much can you recover for damages? The amount of compensation you may recover after a car accident depends on the type of damages you suffered. Each claim is different, both factually and with regard to which laws apply to your claim.  The most important element used in determining the value of a car accident claim is the nature and seriousness of your injuries. What is the real purpose of a damages award? The purpose of a damages award in a personal injury case is to make the victim “whole.” This basically means compensating the victim for everything was lost as a result of the accident or injury.  The only way to accomplish that is through a monetary award.  Every legal claim is different, both factually and with regard to the laws that apply. The most important component in determining the value of a personal injury claim is the nature and seriousness of the actual injuries. The purpose of a damages award in a personal injury case is to make the victim “whole.” This basically means compensating the victim for everything was lost as a result of the accident or injury. The only way to do accomplish that is through a monetary award. Compensatory Damages In most car accident cases, the primary component of damages is medical expenses incurred as a result of the accident.  Reimbursement for medical treatment basically includes compensation for treatment already received, as well as the estimated costs of any medical care that may be required in the future.  Additionally, the injuries suffered can have a substantial impact on the victim’s ability to return to work, either temporarily or permanently.  In that case, damages may include future income. Emotional Distress and Pain and Suffering Another important component of damages in nearly every car accident case is compensation for pain and suffering. If you suffer pain and severe discomfort at the time of the injury, as well as ongoing pain, that is a separate type of damages for which compensation may be available.  Another thing to consider is the effect of more severe injuries, which often lead to emotional distress damages for the psychological impact of the injuries. If you have questions regarding liability and damages or any other personal injury issues in Arkansas or Missouri, please contact the Cottrell Law Office for a free consultation, either online or by calling toll-free at (888) 433-4861.

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Personal Injury

Personal Injury Lawyer Discusses Settlement Liens

If you have been injured as a result of someone else’s negligence, there are basically two ways to receive compensation for that injury.  You can either settle the case out of court or obtain a judgment from the court.  Although a jury verdict in a civil lawsuit would likely result in a larger recovery, jury verdicts are never guaranteed.  Indeed, a personal injury lawyer may be able to settle before trial.  But, settlement is not always the end of the matter.  In many cases, there may be liens on your settlement, but what does that mean exactly? What is a settlement lien and why would I have one? A lien is an interest held by a third-party against the monetary damages awarded for a personal injury settlement or judgment.  Put another way, it is a legal claim someone else has to the money you have been or will be awarded to compensate you for your injuries.  The most common types of settlement liens include liens for medical bills unpaid by insurance, health care insurance payments, Medicaid and Medicare. Healthcare related liens to cover injury-related debts Medical debt is probably the most common source of settlement liens.  When the medical expenses from your injuries result in a large amount of outstanding personal debt, because you were unable to pay for those expenses out of pocket, your personal injury lawyer can agree to “protect” the bills of medical providers. This means that, with your permission, you and your lawyer promise to pay the medical bills when you receive a settlement or judgment. Agreeing to this type of lien can protect you from debt collectors and damage to your credit rating. Reimbursement to health insurance companies Many health insurance companies include provisions in their policies that entitle them to be reimbursed for medical bills for which the insured party was reimbursed through settlement or judgment. Because personal injury awards in a personal injury settlement constitute reimbursement, the insurance company will likely seek a lien against this award in order to recoup the payments they made for injuries resulting from your accident. Your personal injury lawyer will typically be placed on notice of an attempted lien while the claim or litigation is ongoing. Negotiating liens can delay your recovery When facing a lien against your personal injury settlement, your personal injury lawyer can help you figure out how much these third-parties are entitled to and how much settlement money you will actually receive after deducting any liens paid.  Unfortunately, the process of satisfying liens can drag on for months, and if you’re still negotiating your settlement and trying to take into account the amount owed to lien holders while setting this agreement, a lien can complicate those negotiations resulting in delay. When does settlement usually occur? Generally speaking, settlement will occur when either the insurance carrier or the defendant makes an offer of payment, before liability has been proven.  The offer of settlement can occur before the lawsuit is filed.  It can also be made after the lawsuit has been filed, but before the case goes to trial.  A settlement can occur virtually at any point before a jury verdict, or before the court enters an order dismissing the case.  In some cases, a settlement can be reached while the jury is deliberating. Why most personal injury cases settle You may be wondering why cases most often settle.  Settlement provides defendants a way to control the financial risk they face, and to avoid legal costs which can be substantial.  Settlement also allows defendants to keep the legal issues raised in the lawsuit out of the public eye.  For businesses, that can be very important.  Settlement can also be a way to avoid the time involved in a protracted trial. Trials can last for months, if not years; even longer if there is an appeal.  For a plaintiff who has been injured and likely needs income, an early settlement would be very appealing. No matter how good your case may seem, whenever the case is filed in court there is always a chance that the plaintiff can lose the case and receive no compensation at all.  Choosing a personal injury lawyer Depending on your case and your personal situation, a settlement mill type law firm may be sufficient for you.  If you are looking to simply recover your medical expenses and resolve the matter as quickly as possible, then a settlement mill may be the best option.  However, you are looking to recover the fair value of your claim regardless of how long it may take, then a traditional personal injury lawyer is what you need. If you have questions regarding settlement liens, or any other personal injury concerns in Arkansas or Missouri, please contact the Cottrell Law Office for a consultation, either online or by calling us as (888) 433-4861.

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Personal Injury

Who is at Fault for Hitting a Pedestrian?

It can be a challenge trying to figure out who is responsible for an accident.  That is something that accident attorneys deal with regularly.  While many people assume, for instance, that being hit from behind in a car accident is a clear case of liability.  However, every personal injury case is not the same.  So many factors play a role in determining fault.  When it comes to accidents involving pedestrians, there can be even more complicated issues.  Ultimately, the driver is not always at fault when a pedestrian is hit.  Accident attorneys must first examine all of the facts. The pedestrian may be partially responsible for their own injuries Although in the majority of the cases, a driver who hits a pedestrian is at fault that is not necessarily true in every case.  While drivers are expected, even required, to be more cautious when they know that pedestrians are present on or near the roadway, depending on the situation, the pedestrian may be liable to the driver. The general duty of care owed by every driver Automobile drivers are always responsible for driving carefully.  What is considered careful will typically depend on the given situation.  For example, drivers are expected to slow down when it is raining.  If a driver is traveling through a school zone, he or she is expected to maintain a proper lookout for children who may dart out into the roadway.  Basically, the standard of care expected of a driver is that of a “normal, careful and prudent person would do under the same circumstances.” Since no two accidents are the same, the specific must be considered in determining liability. Maintaining watchfulness when pedestrians are nearby Whenever a driver knows pedestrians are present or are likely to be nearby, the driver is expected to be extremely vigilant and maintain strict control of the vehicle.  For example, a driver might be traveling only 25 miles an hour in a residential area, but if they see a child on a bike wobbling down the street, the driver is expected to slow down even more.  If not, the driver may be liable for any resulting accident. When is it possible for a pedestrian to be liable? It should go without saying that a typical driver would take the necessary steps to avoid striking a pedestrian.  But in situations where the pedestrian does something that makes it impossible for the driver to avoid striking the pedestrian, it could be the pedestrian who caused the accident.  Put another way, when a pedestrian behaves in a way that forces a normal driver to take evasive measures to avoid a collision, the pedestrian could potentially be found liable. An example of pedestrian liability Imagine a pedestrian walking down a highway after dark while wearing dark clothing.  This situation would obviously make it difficult for drivers on the roadway to see the pedestrian.  If the driver needs to swerve at the last minute in order to avoid that pedestrian, and in the process collides with another vehicle, the pedestrian may be liable for causing any damage or injury to the other driver and any damaged vehicle. Also, be aware of the distracted pedestrian Another potential source of liability is the distracted pedestrian.  In our culture nearly everyone is attached to their smartphones, so much so that they cross the street without ever taking their eyes off that phone.  Pedestrians are often seen texting and walking which can lead to a person falling off the curb or even walking into traffic.  This is especially true in areas near colleges and universities.  It is certainly expected that pedestrians will remain aware of their surroundings.  It is also expected that drivers on the roadway will be more diligent in avoiding collisions with pedestrians and cars alike.  That is why the facts of each situation matter so much. Pedestrians may not realize the true risk of being on the roadway Many people don’t realize that pedestrians are one of the most at-risk users of roadways in our country?  Although they make up only 3% of individuals involved in traffic collisions, they represent 14% of all traffic fatalities. The safety of pedestrians remains an essential traffic safety issue, especially in light of the statistics. In 2012, for instance, more than 4,500 pedestrians were killed in traffic accidents and approximately 76,000 were injured. If you have questions regarding pedestrian liability for automobile accidents or any other personal injury concerns, call the Cottrell Law Office at (888) 433-4861.

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Personal Injury

Bus Driver Liable for Drunk Driving

When parents send their children to school, especially on the school bus, they expect them to be safe.  Indeed, most school systems encourage parents to send their children on the school bus, as a safe and reliable method of transportation.  Unfortunately, as any personal injury lawyer can attest to, school bus accidents do occur.  An unexpected story out of Boston reminds us that negligence can be unpredictable. School bus driver arrested for DUI A school bus driver in Boston was arrested after crashing into a utility pole while the school bus was loaded with students.  According to police, the bus driver admitted to being under the influence of Nyquil.  He allegedly took the medication earlier in the day while he was driving his bus route.  His blood alcohol level was more than four times the legal limit. At the time of the accident, there were 11 students on the bus.  When the school bus struck the utility pole it was knocked down and landed on an SUV crushing it.  Fortunately, the SUV was unoccupied at the time.   When police arrived on the scene of the accident, the bus driver was unable to walk down the bus steps, requiring the officers to board the bus. A personal injury lawyer knows the stricter DUI standards for commercial vehicle operators While the blood alcohol limit for driving a private vehicle is .08 grams of ethanol per 100 milliliters of blood, a driver with a commercial driver’s license (CDL) operating a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) such as a school bus must maintain a blood alcohol level of .04.  A stricter standard is applied to drivers of commercial vehicles, for several reasons.  For one, commercial vehicles are often larger and heavier, which requires more time to come to a complete stop. For that reason, an operator of a large commercial vehicle, such as a school bus, need to be able to react quicker in order to avoid dangerous situations on the roadway.  Alcohol obviously slows down reaction times, making it virtually impossible to safely drive a commercial motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or drugs.  Driving under the influence also increases the likelihood of other types of accidents occurring, such jack-knifing or rollover accidents. Beer or cough medicine – it’s still a DUI When people hear “DUI,” they assume that refers only to alcohol beverages.  However, in nearly all states, driving under the influence also means under the influence of drugs.  That would include cough medicine, Nyquil or any other medication that causes drowsiness or affects the nervous system in a way that makes operating a motor vehicle dangerous. Beware the alcohol content in Nyquil Many people do not realize that there are over-the-counter medications that include ethanol which is chemically identical to the alcohol in vodka, for instance.  That ethanol will register in a breath alcohol or blood test, just the same as the alcohol in vodka.  Consuming ethanol causes the same drowsiness and loss of coordination as alcoholic beverages.  In fact, the effects of cold medicine like Nyquil may be worsened because of the added effects of decongestants and other drugs also contained in cold medicine. Negligence claims for medicating and driving The consequences of driving while under the influence of certain medications, including the over-the-counter variety, involve more than criminal charges for drunk driving.  It can also lead to liability for negligence.  Medication that may cause drowsiness or other effects must, by law, include a warning that the person taking it should not drive or operate heavy machinery after taking it.  As a personal injury lawyer will tell you, anyone who decides to take the medicine, ignore the warning, and then drive on the roadway is being negligent. In 2013, there were more than 10,000 fatalities reported involving a driver with a blood alcohol concentration over the legal limit. Those accidents accounted for 31% of all traffic fatalities that year.  Put another way, that was one alcohol-impaired fatality every 52 minutes. Negligence of other drivers is the greatest threat on the road The unfortunate reality is, the greatest threat on the roadway is other drivers. Their negligence accounts for more accidents and deaths than any other factor. Intoxication is not the only cause of negligence leading to auto accidents.  Driving while drowsy or fatigued, speeding and distracted driving (such as texting or eating), are also very common causes of accidents. If you have questions regarding negligence and motor vehicle accidents or any other personal injury concerns in Arkansas or Missouri, please contact the Cottrell Law Office for a consultation, either online or by calling us as (888) 433-4861.

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Social Security Disability

What is Social Security Disability Fraud?

When individuals apply for Social Security Benefits, they are required to certify that all of the information they have provided on the application are true and correct to the best of their knowledge.  If someone reports something on their application that they know is false, it may be a crime.  There are different forms of social security disability fraud, which clients should be aware of. Concealing facts or events that could affect eligibility One example of fraud is when an individual makes a false statement on an application or omits certain facts that are likely to have a negative effect on their benefits.  For example, failing to report that you have returned to work, that you are in jail, or withholding the death of a beneficiary, while continuing to receive and cash the deceased person’s checks. Misuse of benefits by a representative payee In some cases, individuals who receive Social Security Benefits are not able to handle their own financial affairs, in which case a relative, friend, or another individual or organization is appointed to handle their Social Security matters. If a Representative Payee misuses an individual’s Social Security Benefits that can be considered a crime. Understanding the responsibilities of a representative payee Some of the duties of a Representative Payee include determining the beneficiary’s total needs and using the benefits received only in the best interests of the beneficiary, maintaining a continuing awareness of the beneficiary’s needs and condition, applying the benefit payments only for the beneficiary’s use and benefit, notifying Social Security Administration of any change in the beneficiary’s circumstances that would affect performance of the payee’s responsibilities, and reporting to Social Security Administration any event that might affect the amount of benefits the beneficiary receives and to give written reports accounting for the use of the benefits. Providing for the essential needs of the beneficiary Part of the responsibility the representative payee has is to apply the benefits payments to the beneficiary’s current and reasonably foreseeable needs, which must be immediate and essential.  For instance, essential needs basically include food, clothing, shelter, utilities, medical care and insurance, dental care, personal hygiene, education, and rehabilitation expenses.  If there are any funds left over once these current needs are met, the representative payee must save and/or invest the remaining funds in trust for the beneficiary. Actions a representative payee should avoid Representative Payees should not use a beneficiary’s funds for their own personal use, or spend funds in any way that would leave the beneficiary without necessary items or services.  Also, it is improper to put a beneficiary’s Social Security or SSI funds in the representative payee’s or someone else’s account.  It is also improper to charge a beneficiary for services unless authorized by the Social Security Administration. If you have questions regarding avoiding fraud, or any other social security disability concerns, call the Cottrell Law Office at (888) 433-4861.

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Motorcycle Accidents

Common Defenses in Motorcycle Accident Cases

If you have been injured in a motorcycle accident, it is common to take legal action in order to receive compensation for your medical expenses, as well as pain and suffering.  If you are considering whether to file a lawsuit, it is important to at least become familiar with some of the common defenses in motorcycle accident cases.  That way, you can prepare for them.  This is equally important, even in situations where a lawsuit is not filed.  Defenses are still important in negotiating settlement with an insurance carrier. Categories of defenses in motorcycle accident cases There are basically two categories of defenses that most often arise in motorcycle accident cases: those based on the facts and those based on the law.  Factual defenses can only be based on the specific factual circumstances of each case, and often include the failure to mitigate damages and contributory or comparative negligence.  On the other hand, legal defenses can bar a claim, based on some law or regulation. Statute of Limitations Defenses in Motorcycle Accident Cases The most common defense in motorcycle accident cases, as well as many other types of personal injury claims, is the statute of limitations.  The “statute of limitations” refers to the deadline or time limit imposed on bringing a legal claim.  This time limit is different depending on the state law that applies.   A statute of limitations restriction the time frame within which a motorcycle accident case may be filed. The allowed amount of time varies depending on the state.  The statute of limitations in Arkansas for personal injury claims, including auto accidents, is three (3) years from the date the injury was sustained. In Missouri, the time limit for bringing a personal injury claim is five (5) years. Liability Defenses in Motorcycle Accident Cases The most common factual defenses in motorcycle accident cases involve proving who is at fault. It is very common for a defendant to try to prove the plaintiff played a role in causing the accident.  This is where the concept of comparative negligence comes in.  In a state that follows the comparative negligence doctrine, each party is assigned a certain percentage of responsibility for the accident. Missouri follows a pure comparative fault system, and Arkansas follows the more common modified Comparative Fault system. With that system, if the percentage of the plaintiff’s negligence reaches a certain threshold, then the plaintiff’s recovery will be completely barred. The Failure to Mitigate Damages Under the law, an injured party maintains the responsibility to mitigate damages which means that, if anything is done to make the injury worse, the amount of potential recovery may be reduced. For instance, if the injured party is ordered by his doctor to avoid certain activities following a motorcycle accident and those instructions are not followed and the injuries worsen, the amount of recoverable damages will be reduced. If you have questions regarding motorcycle accidents, or any other personal injury concerns, call the Cottrell Law Office at (888) 433-4861.

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